RECENT PROJECTS

In February of 2014 Institute for Urban and Minority Education at Teachers College hosted a short New York City Educational Study Tour for a small group of principals/head teachers representing high schools located in the East End area of  London, England.   The goal for the tour was to provide our visitors with a comparative understanding of urban education by offering an opportunity to learn first-hand about our schools, and the unique teaching and learning experiences taking place in New York public schools.  

 

(Photo taken at New York City Department of Education, hosted by Chancellor Carmen Farina & Senior Deputy Chancellor Dorita Gibson).

NCAA Youth Day 2013 provided over 250 middle-school students from the Greater Atlanta area with an opportunity to learn about community service and maintaining a healthy mind and body.  This special event took place during the NCAA Final Four 2013 Men's Championship in Atlanta Ga, at the Georgia World Congress Center, and included partnerships with YES Inc., the United Way of Atlanta, and Morehouse College.

Beyond the Bricks - Harlem is an out-of-school time program developed by Washington/Koen Media and brought to life by Veronica Holly and her team at IUME, Teachers College.  The Beyond the Bricks program is designed for young Black males to explore and interrogate how they are represented through broad media culture and to produce and present their own stories as a way to respond to these explorations and inquiries.  This four month course takes a self-reflective, communal, and fellowship approach to inquiry - enabling students to ponder together historical perspectives and current media representations of Black men and boys.   The program concludes with the young men developing and producing their own short video, reframing the discourse on what it means to be young, urban and male.  For more on Beyond the Bricks-Harlem check out http://www.beyondthebricksproject.com/harlem-usa-cohort-one

 

TESTIMONIAL

"Veronica Holly respects and cares about her fellow human beings, individually and collectively. She can be a critical friend, a loyal and supportive colleague and a strong conceptual leader in community development. In each of these roles she leads with her heart and her mind. For fifteen years she has been one of my most resourceful advocates and support persons as well as a deeply cherished professional friend. It is with appreciation, enthusiasm and love that I grasp her willing hand in the common cause." Edmund W. Gordon